Oaksterdam University

The 10th Amendment

Peace In Medicine

Teahouse Collective

Help in fighting court cases

Legal consultant and cannabis expert witness Chris Conrad, author of Cannabis Yields and Dosage, offers advice and professional services for court cases, sometimes paid by a county’s indigent defense fund. Info at chrisconrad.com.

SPECIAL NEEDS

special-needs

Joey Perez, front,with his mother, Mieko, their attorney Jeremy Joseph, and Joshua Shelton, a lawyer for HOPE Wellness Collective in Westminter CA, spoke at a press conference where Mieko explained how Joey barely survived almost a decade of phar- maceutical drugs that left his body at a mere 46 pounds. Joey, now 11 years old, is being treated with medical marijuana and has more than doubled his body weight. The collective has been providing medicine and other crucial services for special needs children, but was told to shut down immediately. Mieko and other families of special needs children fear there will be no safe location for them to obtain cannabis if the city closes the collective. The city later softened its posi- tion and said it will provide HOPE with the framework for discussions with the city about how to move forward.

Photo and report by Sam Sabzehzar, medicalmarijuana411.com

Read More: SPECIAL NEEDS

Drug War POW updates; several recent releases

By Vanessa Nelson, Medical MarijuanaofAmerica.com

Several notable medical marijuana providers have been released from federal prisons recently. One was Kenneth ‘Kena’ Affolter, whose company, Beyond Bomb, supplied dispensaries with a wide array of medicinal edibles. A tripped burglar alarm at an Oakland warehouse in 2006 led to a raid and federal charges for Affolter and his employees. All the defendants took plea deals, but Affolter’s 70-month prison sentence was the longest by far. A naturally deep thinker, he spent much of his incarceration reading, writing and meditating. He finished serving hard time this spring.

Former medical grower David Davidson also finished off a federal sentence this spring, ending a seven-year ordeal. Davidson was initially busted by local Tehama County authorities in 2003 but disappeared after they turned his case over to federal prosecutors. He was captured in New Mexico in 2007, after his co-defendant revealed his whereabouts

Read More: Drug War POW updates; several recent releases

Feds raid THC Ministry

Christie arrested, denied bail

By Don E Wirtshafter

Rev. Roger Christie, leader of the THC Ministry based in Hawai’i, is in jail without bond. In the last issue of West Coast Leaf, an optimistic Christie said he had been raided but not charged and felt safe. Early on the morning of July 8, agents from the Drug Enforcement Admin. stormed the THC Ministry and the homes of many of its practitioners, and 14 were arrested.

The Ministry, Roger and others had sued in federal court in 2004 to establish their legal right as sincere believers to use their chosen sacrament.

The government responded by arguing that even though the Ministry was engaged in the production and distribution of marijuana, it was not under federal investigation or prosecution. Since the ministry could not prove that arrest and prosecution for use of their sacrament was imminent, the

Read More: Feds raid THC Ministry

Mediation offers a handy alternative to courts in delicate issues like divorce and child custody

By Naomi T. Stal, Esq.* Mediation Company PLC Treating divorce as simply a legal process while ignoring underlying emotional issues can be dangerous for cannabis patients, as judges can be closed-minded, uneducated, or even capricious.

People often use legal `claims’ as weapons to act out their strong negative emotions. As a common example, a spouse may try manipulating the court’s view of cannabis to prevent shared custody of chil- dren, or to take away custody.

Divorce mediation can provide an alternative for lawyers and judges. It is a process where a neutral person helps divorcing couples arrive at agreements, taking into consideration the emotional issues of all parties.

There are key differences between the traditional divorce process and divorce mediation. Mediation is private, while courtrooms are public. Mediators are bound by confidentiality rules and cannot discuss anything mentioned in mediation.*

Mediation is a voluntary process in which parties make agreements

Read More: Mediation offers a handy alternative to courts in delicate issues like divorce and child custody

Legal Services